January 21 –February 22

La Cenerentola

Rossini’s Cinderella stars in Herheim’s operatic game

Intro

The story of the servant girl who is magically transformed into a princess exists in many forms. Stefan Herheim’s version of Gioachino Rossini’s Cinderella brings the old composer to life, and shows us how the real magic lies in the beauty of the human voice.

This is a production that is just as vivacious and powerful as Rossini’s immortal music.

The composer triumphs

The opera’s full title is La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo (Cinderella, or Goodness Triumphant), and is based on the well-known fairy tale by Charles Perrault. Herheim’s production features no glass slipper or pumpkin carriage, but is just as much a game of power and desire as the original.

“I’ve never trusted this good girl,” says the director, and instead presents us with a wilder and more cunning Cinderella.

The person who triumphs in the end, however, is Rossini himself. He enters the production in the role of Cinderella’s stepfather, Don Magnifico. By directing the piece, and reviving his own music, it is the dead composer who rises from the ashes.

Hypnotic beauty

Gioachino Rossini was the man behind and king of the Italian bel canto tradition that reached its peak at the start of the 1800s. The tradition’s objective was to highlight the ultimate beauty of the human voice through breakneck-paced arias and impressive coloraturas. Rossini’s bel canto operas culminated in La Cenerentola, which he composed in just 24 days, exactly 200 years ago.
1817 was the year that followed the huge success of The Barber of Seville, and the 25 year old composer was at the height of his career. His music made audiences go wild – women fainted and had to be carried from the opera house – and its intensity grew and grew, creating a hypnotising effect and earning Rossini the nickname ‘Monsieur Crescendo’. Like a huge locomotive that sets great machines in motion, or the sound of the industrial revolution as it approached the cities of Europe, La Cenerentola is introduced by music full of energy.

Norwegian star director

Since the success of Julius Cæsar at Youngstorget in 2005, Stefan Herheim’s opera productions at The Norwegian National Opera & Ballet have attracted significant attention. His versions of La bohème, Lulu, Tannhäuser and Salome roused, engaged and entertained audiences in an interplay between references and reflection on one side, and musical playfulness on the other. “The most spectacular opera production ever to be performed on Norwegian soil,” wrote NRK of Tannhäuser. The prestigious Opernwelt magazine has also appointed Herheim ‘Opera Director of the Year’ a full three times – in 2006, 2008 and 2010. Herheim has attained a significant position in the international opera scene, with productions at festivals in Bayreuth and Salzburg, and at Staatsoper Berlin, Komische Oper Berlin, La Monnaie in Brussels and Nederlandse Opera, and at the opera houses of Stuttgart, Graz and Lyon.

  • Premiere discussion
  • Free introduction one hour before the performance
  • MusicGioachino Rossini
  • Libretto Jacopo Ferretti
  • ConductingAntonino Fogliani
  • DirectingStefan Herheim
  • Set design Daniel Unger og Stefan Herheim
  • Costume design Esther Bialas
  • Lighting design Phoenix (Andreas Hofer)
  • Video design fettFilm
  • Dramaturg Alexander Meier-Dörzenbach

    Roles

    Main roles

    • Clorinda

      Eli Kristin Hanssveen
      Playing the following days
      • 21. Jan 2017
      • 24. Jan 2017
      • 27. Jan 2017
      • 30. Jan 2017
      • 2. Feb 2017
      • 6. Feb 2017
      • 11. Feb 2017
      • 13. Feb 2017
      • 17. Feb 2017
      • 20. Feb 2017
      • 22. Feb 2017
    • Dandini

      Aleksander Nohr
      Playing the following days
      • 21. Jan 2017
      • 24. Jan 2017
      • 27. Jan 2017
      • 30. Jan 2017
      • 2. Feb 2017
      • 6. Feb 2017
      • 11. Feb 2017
      • 13. Feb 2017
      • 17. Feb 2017
      • 20. Feb 2017
      • 22. Feb 2017
    • Don Ramiro

      Taylor Stayton
      Playing the following days
      • 21. Jan 2017
      • 24. Jan 2017
      • 27. Jan 2017
      • 30. Jan 2017
      • 2. Feb 2017
      • 6. Feb 2017
      • 11. Feb 2017
      • 13. Feb 2017
      • 17. Feb 2017
      • 20. Feb 2017
      • 22. Feb 2017
    • Rossini / Don Magnifico

      Renato Girolami
      Playing the following days
      • 21. Jan 2017
      • 24. Jan 2017
      • 27. Jan 2017
      • 30. Jan 2017
      • 2. Feb 2017
      • 6. Feb 2017
      • 11. Feb 2017
      • 13. Feb 2017
      • 17. Feb 2017
      • 20. Feb 2017
      • 22. Feb 2017
    • Tisbe

      Désirée Baraula
      Playing the following days
      • 21. Jan 2017
      • 24. Jan 2017
      • 27. Jan 2017
      • 30. Jan 2017
      • 2. Feb 2017
      • 6. Feb 2017
      • 11. Feb 2017
      • 13. Feb 2017
      • 17. Feb 2017
      • 20. Feb 2017
      • 22. Feb 2017
    • Vaskedame / Askepott

      Anna Goryachova
      Playing the following days
      • 21. Jan 2017
      • 24. Jan 2017
      • 27. Jan 2017
      • 2. Feb 2017
      • 6. Feb 2017
      • 13. Feb 2017
      • 17. Feb 2017
      Margarita Gritskova
      Playing the following days
      • 30. Jan 2017
      • 11. Feb 2017
      • 20. Feb 2017
      • 22. Feb 2017

    Other roles

    Trailers and lectures

    Introduksjonsforedrag La Cenerentola, Hedda Høgåsen-Hallesby
    La Cenerentola: Premieresamtale med bl.a. Stefan Herheim
    Ellevill Askepott i Stefan Herheims regi
    Trailer La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo - Stefan Herheim
    Ta en kikk bak scenen og se hvordan kostymene til La Cenerentola lages!
    En annerledes Askepott! Animasjon: Live Bergitte Molvær / Illustrasjon: Ingun Redalen White

    Synopsis

    Once upon a time there was a fairy tale. It was about an innocently good girl who got banished to the ashes of the fireplace by her evil stepmother. At the same time a prince was in need to find a bride and he looked everywhere in hope to find an innocently good one by picking the prettiest one. Good luck with that! – oh well, it was a fairy tale… Anyway, it was this fairy tale which Rossini used to make yet another fervid opera for the Roman carnival of 1817. To generate light and heat from this material, some alterations were necessary…

    Act 1

    Clorinda and Tisbe are in the middle of a vain argument when Cinderella starts singing a song about a king who found three potential brides, but chose the innocently good one. Alidoro, teacher of Prince Ramiro, enters, dressed disguised as a poor pilgrim. The stepsisters want to send him away, but Cinderella offers him bread and coffee. Unexpectedly but necessarily, courtiers announce that Ramiro will soon come himself: he is looking for the most beautiful girl and will host a festivity to choose his bride. The father of the house, Don Magnifico, hopes that it will be one of the stepsisters: marriage to a wealthy man and regal reproduction is the only way to save the family fortune.

    When everybody has left to get prepared, Ramiro enters alone dressed in his servant’s clothes, so he can freely observe the prospective brides. When Cinderella returns, he asks her who she is, but the confused girl fails to explain and runs away. Finally, the supposed prince arrives – it is in fact Ramiro’s valet, Dandini, dressed as royalty. Magnifico, Clorinda, and Tisbe flatter and adulate him, and he invites them all to the splendid feast. Cinderella asks to be taken along, but Magnifico refuses. Alidoro however announces that there should be a third daughter in the house, nonetheless Magnifico claims her to be dead. Left alone with Cinderella, Alidoro tells her he will take her to the ball and explains that a God from above will reward her for her goodness.

    Ramiro and Dandini are somewhat confused, since Alidoro has spoken so well of one of Magnifico’s daughters in advance. Clorinda and Tisbe appear again, following Dandini, who still pretends to be the prince. When he offers Ramiro as a husband to the sister whom the prince does not marry, they are furious at the idea of wedlock with a simple servant. Alidoro enters with a veiled beauty whose strange resemblance to Cinderella is noticed by all. Unable to make sense of the situation, everyone sits down to supper, fearing that the dream may vanish in smoke.

    INTERMISSION

    Act 2

    Magnifico suspects that the arrival of the strange beauty might ruin his own daughters’ chances to marry the prince. Cinderella, tired of being pursued by Dandini, tells him clearly that she is in love with his servant. Overhearing this, Ramiro is overjoyed and steps forward. Cinderella, however, tells him that she will return to the home fire and does not want him to follow her. She hands him one bracelet of a pair: if he really cares for her, he will find the counterpart and thereby her. The prince resolves to win the mysterious, poised and fascinating girl.

    Meanwhile Magnifico, who still takes Dandini for the prince, confronts him, insisting that he decide which of his daughters he will get married to. When Dandini reveals that he is in fact the prince’s valet, Magnifico is furious.

    Magnifico and the sisters return home foul-tempered and order Cinderella to prepare dinner. During a thunderstorm, Alidoro arranges for Ramiro’s carriage to break down in front of Magnifico’s house, so that the prince has to take refuge inside. Cinderella and Ramiro recognize each other, as everybody comments on the situation. Prince Ramiro proclaims revenge, but Cinderella asks him for general forgiveness. 

    When Ramiro and Cinderella celebrate their wedding, Magnifico tries to kneel infront of the new princess, but she asks only to be acknowledged as his daughter. Born into a common world, she has seen her life change and declares that the days of sitting by the fire are finally over.

    Askepott gjennom tidene

    This text exists only in Norwegian. You can use Google Translate if you want to get an idea of the content!

    SLAVE, MORDER ELLER PRINSESSE: ASKEPOTT GJENNOM TIDENE

    Når vi tenker på Askepott, har vi først og fremst et bilde av en mistet glassko og en god fe – men akkurat disse ingrediensene mangler i Rossinis opera om Askepott. Her er det hverken magi eller glassko. For fortellingene om Askepott er langt mer sprikende enn det vi vanligvis møter i eventyrbøker og filmer, og gir et mangfoldig og variert bilde av kvinnen gjennom alle tider.

    Historien om Askepott har eksistert i over 3500 år og i nesten alle kulturer. I oldtidens Egypt ble den greske piken Rhodopsis solgt som slavinne til en gård ved Nilens bredd, der hun snart ble gjort til spott og spe fordi hun var annerledes. Istedenfor glatt, svart hår og brune øyne, hadde hun lyse lokker og grønne øynene, og huden hadde en lys teint istedenfor den solbrune fargen man finner hos egypterne. Den eneste gleden i livet hennes var dyrene: småfuglene som spiste av hånden hennes, den lille apekatten som hoppet opp på skulderen hennes og flodhesten som steg opp av den gjørmete elven når Rhodopsis sang og danset langs elvebredden … En kveld så gårdsherren henne danse lett, men barbent ved elven og ga henne et par sandaler av rosegull. Men dette førte bare til økt misnøye hos de andre slavene.

    Da faraoen skulle holde hoff i Memphis, ble alle fra kongeriket invitert, men Rhodopsis ble pålagt så mye arbeid at hun ikke kunne gå. Isteden satt hun ved Nilen og vasket klær og sang samtidig en sørgmodig vise for seg selv. Denne gjentok hun så ofte at selv flodhesten ble irritert og la i vei med et plask så voldsomt at skoene hennes ble gjennomvåte av vannspruten. Men ikke før hadde hun lagt dem til tørk på en stein, så stupte en falk ned og nappet til seg en av sandalene. Denne fuglen var i virkeligheten guden Horus, som nå fløy til farao Ahmose og la den delikate skoen i fanget hans. Faraoen lot derpå alle kvinner i riket prøve den smekre skoen, men den passet ingen. Nå ble kongeskipets ametystfargede silkeseil heist og faraoen stevnet ut for å lete langs Nilens bredder – der han til slutt fant Rhodopsis – som ikke bare passet skoen, men også hadde den andre. Han gjorde henne til dronning, selv om dette først førte til bestyrtelse blant folket, ikke bare fordi hun var slavinne, men hun var i tillegg en fremmed. Til dette svarte faraoen: «Hun er den mest egyptiske av alle, for hennes øyne er grønne som Nilen, hennes hår er lyst og sart som papyrus og hennes hud er rosa som lotusblomsten – hun gjenspeiler det vakreste i dette landet."

    I denne fortellingen finner vi elementene vann, jord og luft gjennom den gjørmebadende flodhesten og den flyvende falken – men den så vesentlige ilden i fortellingen mangler. For både for Askepott, Cinderella, Cenerentola, Cendrillon, Aschenputtel, Cenicienta, Külkedisi og Aschenbrödel er det ilden, det fjerde element, som har gitt navn til historien – enten i form av ild eller som den mørkbrente asken. Likevel er dette først lagt til i den europeiske versjonen, mens for eksempel det nære forholdet til dyrene også finnes i den kinesiske varianten.

    Under den senere del av Tang-Dynastiet i Kina, cirka år 850, ble historien om Ye-Xian, piken som ble behandlet så dårlig av stemoren og stesøstrene, nedtegnet. Hun fant en venn i en gullfisk, som hun alltid delte den lille matrasjonen sin med. Den misunnelige stemoren så hvordan fisken vokste og trivdes, og en dag tok hun den og serverte den til kveldsmat til familien. Da kom en gammel mann til Ye-Xian og rådet henne til å oppbevare fiskebeinene og be dem om hjelp når hun måtte ha behov for det. Da vårens fest skulle avholdes, ba hun om en praktfull kjole og gullsko, men da hun ankom festen og så at stefamilien hennes også var der, løp hun forskrekket ut igjen og mistet i farten en av skoene. Nå lot herskeren reise en paviljong for den lille, dyrbare skoen, og alle kvinner strømmet til for å prøve den. Siden fiskebeinånden var stum så lenge de to skoene ikke var sammen, stjal Ye-Xian gullskoen, og ble tatt på fersk gjerning. Men i samme øyeblikk som hun tok på begge skoene, forvandlet hverdagskjolen hennes seg til den vakreste festkjole. Herskeren gjenkjente hennes skjønnhet og tok henne umiddelbart til kone.

    I kinesisk sammenheng symboliserer fisken rikdom og fruktbarhet, og den delikate, tapte skoen har en helt spesiell betydning: I over 1000 år var bittesmå, sammensnørte lotusføtter gjenstand for fetisjtilbedelse. De symboliserte kvinnen og var samtidig en metafor for harmonien og kjærligheten mellom mann og kvinne. Mens kvinnen selv ble til et sterkt hemmet objekt for begjær gjennom den forkrøplende fotbindingen.

    Fysisk brutalitet finner vi også i brødrene Grimms kjente versjon av fortellingen om Askepott fra begynnelsen av det 19. århundre. Da de slemme stesøstrene hakker av seg stortå og hæl for å passe i den bittelille skoen, kurrer duene: 
    «Kongesønn god, kongesønn god, 
    i skoen er blod, 
    den skoen så hardt hennes fot må klemme; 
    den rette brud sitter ennå hjemme.»

    Mot slutten av eventyret får begge stesøstrene endatil som straff hakket ut begge øynene, slik at de taper synet og må leve med sin blodige blindhet resten av sin levetid.

    Ikke før 30 år etter Rossinis død, i 1897, blir brødrene Grimms eventyr utgitt på italiensk. For operaen er derfor to andre adapsjoner av større betydning: Den allment kjente versjonen av Charles Perrault, samt den første europeiske, italienske og sågar napolitanske versjonen av Giambattista Basile: «La gatta cenerentola» («Askekatten»). Dette er den første dags sjette historie (1,6) i eventyrsamlingen Pentamerone som ble publisert etter hans død i 1636. Her blir den adelige Zezólla - som er blitt forvist til ovnen av stemoren - til et askevesen med tilknytning til ild, om enn bare i navnet. Men i motsetning til i de andre versjonene har hun for en stor del selv bidratt til dette: Hun er ikke særlig begeistret for den første stemoren sin og sørger for å rydde henne av veien ved at hun forsettlig brekker nakken på henne med et tungt kistelokk! Så istedenfor den tolerante engelen har vi her en morder som sørger for at faren gifter seg med lærerinnen hennes, som imidlertid viser seg å være en «slem» stemor med mange egne barn.

    I denne versjonen av fortellingen møter vi også magi og trolldom samt årsaken til kampen om den berømte glasskoen. Den mistede tøffelen, som ifølge napolitansk dialekt heter «chianella», blir i den italienske versjonen omdøpt til «pianella»: En slags oversko med høye hæler og pelsbesetning som gjorde det mulig for damer å stige ut av vognen og gå noen skritt gjennom vinterens sørpe uten å ødelegge kjolen sin. Zezóllas sko er besatt med gråverk (den sobellignende vinterpelsen til ekorn) – på fransk heter det «vair». Mange antar nå at det foreligger en overføringsfeil i Charles Perraults berømte versjon Cendrillon, ou La petite Pantoufle de Verre fra 1697. «Vair» (gråverkpels) og «verre» (glass) er homofoner og slik kan den komfortable pelsgamasjen ved en feil ha blitt til en skjør og poetisk uanvendelig tøffel av glass... Men det hadde ikke vært særlig 'eventyrlig' – når alt kommer til alt er glasskoen det eneste som ikke forvandles tilbake etter det magiske midnattsslaget, og ikke mindre viktig: Den unike passformen til det skjøre glassfottøyet viser hvor spesiell Cinderellas sko er, siden en pelstøffel uten problemer kan utvides til å passe en større fot.

    I sitt eventyr introduserte Perrault ikke bare den gode fe som gudmor, han skapte også magien rundt gresskarvognen med de seks musehestene, som gjennom Disneys filmversjon fra 1950 har etset seg inn i den kollektive hukommelsen i generasjoner. Til tross for hans litterære anerkjennelse innen den ellers muntlige eventyrtradisjonen, er hans moral likevel fylt av bitende satire – man kan ha både intelligens, skjønnhet og noblesse: 
    «men det hjelper slett ikke kun å være i besittelse av det - 
    på veien gjennom livet vil dere bli utestengt dersom dere ikke har en forbindelse som hjelper dere å ta det i bruk.»

    Så uten gode forbindelser nytter hverken talent eller gode egenskaper – dette gjaldt like mye til Perraults tid ved Ludwig XIVs hoff som i dag.

    I moderne versjoner, som for eksempel i Hollywood-suksessen Pretty Woman, fungerer Askepott som ironisk referanse: Prince Charming er også den gode feen, som istedenfor tryllestav er utstyrt med et gullkantet kredittkort som tryller frem den moteriktige forvandlingen - og Askepott er ikke iført skjøre glassko, men knehøye gatepikestøvletter i størrelse 41. Julia Roberts spiller også hovedrollen i filmen Notting Hill, der vi møter eventyret om Askepott med en kjønnsvri. Innen samme tiår finner vi dessuten Drew Barrymore i hovedrollen i Ever After: A Cinderella Story, der hun mestrer å blåse både intelligens, handlekraft og vilje inn i den ellers så fåmælte, vakre eventyrfiguren. Men disse celluloidillusjonene fra slutten av det 20. århundre blekner hvis man tenker på historien om nåtidens trolig mest berømte operasangerinne, Anna Netrebko, hvis første jobb var å feie gulvene i Mariinski-teateret, der hun bare få år senere startet sin strålende karriere som Susanna i Mozarts opera. I dette tilfellet ville nok eventyret endt med ordene: «og hun sang som en gudinne alle sine dager ...», mens virkeligheten nok snarere oppleves som en berg-og-dalbane-tur mellom markedsføringens glans og elendighet, kulissesladder, PR-arbeid og forventningspress.

    Etter å ha stukket seg på en forgiftet tein under spinningen, venter Tornerose i dyp, bevisstløs søvn på det reddende kysset, og Snøhvit ligger pent og pyntelig i glasskisten hjemme hos de syv dvergene til prinsen kommer – riktignok har heller ikke Askepott mye å si i eventyret, men det virker som hun har store forventninger til livet og nyter hvert minutt av det til klokken slår midnattsslaget. Og at den skjøre glasskoen er det eneste hun har igjen av magien, kan tolkes som en påminnelse til oss om at selv de skjøreste, mest utopiske drømmer er verdt å holde fast ved – selv om de kanskje ikke kan trylle bort livets realiteter til evig tid ...

    Christine Koht

    This text exists only in Norwegian. You can use Google Translate if you want to get an idea of the content!

    Det er kjolen som gjør det. Kjolen er beviset. Den magiske kjolen avviser de overlegne, fødte prinsessene og plukker ut den ekte, hun som er prinsesse av sjela og hjertet: Diana, Askepott og alle vi andre som vet at det var noe vi burde vinne fordi – vel, fordi vi fortjener det, akkurat som l’Oreal og alle verdens eventyr sier. 

    Jeg tegnet sånne prinsesser og sånne kjoler da jeg var barn, jeg også – hun liknet ikke mye på meg, den prinsessen, siden jeg var liten og mørk og rund og hun var tynn og blond. Det var ikke for mange prinsessekjoler å få tak i heller, i Asker på 70-tallet: bolleklipp, brun-og-beige-stripete gensere så syntetiske at det gnistret av dem.

    Jeg ble ikke tynn og blond, for noen barnslige eventyrdrømmer går ikke i oppfyllelse og skal det ikke heller. Men alle eventyr handler om overgangen fra barn til voksen, om å bli den du egentlig er og det går ikke hvis ikke hjertet og barnet får bli med.

    Så jeg elsker fremdeles prinsessekjoler. Og da mener jeg ikke noe underernært og stålgrått fra et kjølig motehus, men fargesprakende, overdådige, struttende bløtkaker fulle av rysjer og glitter og tøys. Vi lever så kort og skal være døde så lenge, hvorfor i all verden skal vi kle oss i grått og beige?

    Fordi grått og beige betyr makt. Grått og beige og stramt og smalt betyr kontroll. Og er det noe vår tids adel – direktørene, styrelederne, hr-sjefene – uansett kjønn skal utstråle, så er det kontroll. Kontroll i tanke, ord og gjerning forteller du om med vann, salat og sylskarpe snitt. Rysjer gjør ikke noe godt verken for bunnlinja eller powerpoint-presentasjonen.

    Så verden tappes for farger. Ta en titt i en klesforretning nær deg eller i et kjøkken du kjenner: hvitt, grått, svart med en og annen prikk eller telysholder som eneste fargeklatt til kontrast. Og det når vi faktisk har en hel regnbue å ta av.

    Bare deprimerte barn velger sånne farger når de skal tegne. Og hva som er i veien med småjenter som velger «den lille sorte» kjolen orker jeg ikke tenke på engang. Så fordi jeg ikke har kontroll som mål og fordi jeg heier på alle verdens glupske og ildfulle jentesjeler, fortsetter jeg å gå for prinsesse-utstyret, komplett med tyll og fjas.

    Noen av oss må jo det. Det er så innmari mange av de andre.

    Nå er det sjelden sant, det Disney-aktige eventyrbudskapet at bare du drømmer hardt nok og er trofast nok mot den drømmen, så kommer yndige småfugler og mus og syr vinnerkjolen din. Det er en fortelling som for tiden går sin seiersgang også for voksne, på konferanser og i coaching-bøker: følg drømmen og suksess kommer.

    Men det stemmer jo ikke. Det er ikke sånn det foregår, drømmer er skjøre og går i knas på alle kanter rundt oss, enten de handler om prinser eller din egen lille oppstartbedrift. Men noe fortjener alle, noen prøvelser kommer vi oss gjennom med hjertet i behold, de fleste av oss, og det skal anerkjennes og feires.

    Og kjoler er faktisk magiske. Jeg stripynter meg så snart jeg får sjansen og vil iherdig anbefale ballkjole til hverdags. For visst skjer det noe da. Ikke nødvendigvis noe sånn ute i verden, strutteskjørtene mine får alltid terningkast én av kjolepolitiet.

    Men innvendig. Innvendig bobler og bruser det, innvendig seirer prinsessekjolen alltid. Innvendig gir kjolen og jeg fingeren til all adelens kontroll og det blide barnehjertet springer ut i fryd.

    Reviews

    Askepott og Herheim er sant

    Sunday, January 22, 2017
    VGs anmeldelse: Helt strålende
    Read more

    Askepott er fantastisk, fjollete fjas

    Sunday, January 22, 2017
    Aftenposten: Operakomedien til nye høyder
    Read more

    Trampeklapp for Askepott

    Monday, January 23, 2017
    Vårt land: Rossini sprudlet
    Read more

    Komisk opera i verdensklasse

    Wednesday, January 25, 2017
    Scenekunst: Gjennomført til fingerspissene
    Read more

    Makes Rossini great again

    Monday, January 23, 2017
    Die Welt
    Read more

    Grandios La Cenerentola in Oslo

    Monday, February 27, 2017
    Frankfurter Allgemein Zeitung
    Read more

    Dates

    Completed

    • Scene
      :
      Main House
    • Price
      :
      100 - 695 NOK
    • /
      1 intermission

    January 2017

    Completed
    Completed
    Completed
    Completed

    February 2017

    Completed
    Completed
    Completed
    Completed
    Completed
    Completed
    Completed