March 12 –April 2

Elysium

Intro

What is a man? Where are the boundaries between our bodies, our thoughts and new technology? Are we still human if we remove pain, conflict and sorrow?

The new opera Elysium by Norwegian composer Rolf Wallin and British playwright Mark Ravenhill raises these questions by introducing us to the ‘transhumans’ of the future. A computer chip implanted in the throat allows them to freely share thoughts, sensory perceptions and emotions with each other. Nor do these new ‘transhumans’ live under the threat of decease or death. Peace and affluence have become a worldwide reality.

However, 40 original humans have been preserved in a living cultural history museum on an isolated island. Once a year they perform Beethoven's opera Fidelio for the ‘transhumans’. They do this to commemorate the long struggle for human rights, which we praised in memorial speeches and at art expressions, but never managed to realise in our time.

The play follows two women who are attracted to each other, a Wife who longs to break away from the difficult life of humans, and a ‘transhuman’ Woman who longs back to the genuinely human. The tension between the two of them is reflected in the musical expression, which ranges from fragments of Beethoven's opera about human value to electronically processed voices.

Elysium is a fable about man's eternal longing for a better existence, but also about our inherent dread of change.

Artistic team

Rolf Wallin is one of Scandinavia’s leading contemporary composers, whose works are continuously being commissioned and performed by various ensembles in Norway and abroad. His background ranges from jazz, avantgarde rock and early music, to a traditional classical training. Mark Ravenhill is a British actor, writer and author, whose works include the highly praised play Shopping and Fucking. Director is the British theatre and opera director David Poutney, while opera set designer Leslie Travers has created the visual expression.

  • Premier discussion one week before the premiere.
  • Free introduction one hour before the performance

 

 

  • Music Rolf Wallin
  • Libretto Mark Ravenhill
  • Musical direction Baldur Brönnimann
  • Direction David Pountney
  • Set design and costumes Leslie Travers
  • Light design Linus Fellbom
  • Dramaturg for the librettist Jack Bradley

Roles

Main roles

  • Coraig/Jaquino

    Nils Harald Sødal
    Playing the following days
    • 12. Mar 2016
    • 14. Mar 2016
    • 17. Mar 2016
    • 19. Mar 2016
    • 29. Mar 2016
    • 31. Mar 2016
    • 2. Apr 2016
  • Ektemannen

    Ketil Hugaas
    Playing the following days
    • 12. Mar 2016
    • 14. Mar 2016
    • 17. Mar 2016
    • 19. Mar 2016
    • 29. Mar 2016
    • 31. Mar 2016
    • 2. Apr 2016
  • Hustruen

    Lina Johnson
    Playing the following days
    • 12. Mar 2016
    • 14. Mar 2016
    • 17. Mar 2016
    • 19. Mar 2016
    • 29. Mar 2016
    • 31. Mar 2016
    • 2. Apr 2016
  • Kvinnen

    Eli Kristin Hanssveen
    Playing the following days
    • 12. Mar 2016
    • 14. Mar 2016
    • 17. Mar 2016
    • 19. Mar 2016
    • 29. Mar 2016
    • 31. Mar 2016
    • 2. Apr 2016
  • Naboen

    Hege Høisæter
    Playing the following days
    • 12. Mar 2016
    • 14. Mar 2016
    • 17. Mar 2016
    • 19. Mar 2016
    • 29. Mar 2016
    • 31. Mar 2016
    • 2. Apr 2016

Synopsis

Introduction

Sometime, in the not too distant future, the human race is in the process of one final giant evolutionary step. It has already re-invented itself as a species. Medical advances and engineered births and hugely expanded life expectancy have meant that the very notion of what it is to be human, has changed. This is now the world of the transhumans.

But what of «human rights»?

Just as humans had looked back on the brutality of the mongol raids or the Inquisition with horror, the new rich and peace loving transhumans can only look at the 21st century with disbelief. Although a Declaration of Human Rights had existed more than 200 years, the human race seemed still incapable of being truly humane. Wars, violence and environmental destruction had brought it to the brink of self-extinction.

But one single technological gizmo, a chip, had saved humanity. Implanted in the throat and designed to transmit tremendous amounts of information encoded in eerie but harmless music, the chip had enhanced communication between humans immeasurably.

Where there had been language, slow and imprecise which seemed to ensure humans would constantly misinterpret each other, now transhumans fluently and accurately exchanged complex feelings, sensations and motivations.

Because its success in creating peace and progress, the Chip is now mandatory throughout the planet, its application and acceptance almost universal. 

1st Act

As the opera begins, we are on a small island populated by humans who have not yet undergone transformation. Kept under tight security conditions they live as an example of humans as they once were. There we meet a Wife who feels stifled by the shortcomings and pains of human life: her violent Husband, and her Neighbour who is terminally ill from a brain tumor.

The community is preparing for their annual performance for visiting transhumans: Beethoven's opera Fidelio which serves as a timeless reminder of the long struggle for human rights.

When the Neighbour breaks down in the middle of her aria, the performance is stopped. Using the ensuing chaos to break free, the Wife flees. She meets a transhuman Woman, and they are immediately drawn to one another, mutually fascinated. The Woman is curious about old humanity and their capacity for genuine unfiltered emotions and feelings.

After this intense first meeting, the Wife decides to escape from the island and re-unite with the Woman and to become like her. She sets sail from the island to go to the world of transhumans.

2nd Act

Some months later, the Woman returns to the island. It transpires she has had a short affair with the Wife on the mainland, but seeing their goals were opposite, they have now parted. The Woman has undergone an illegal operation to remove her Chip and now wants to live like the other islanders. The Husband and his son (Boy) agree to take care of her, even though they still yearn for the missing wife/mother. 

The leader of the transhumans and the inventor of the Chip, Coraig, then arrives on the island. For humans and Transhumans alike, a new, final next step has begun: the process is known as Singularity, by which the mind leaves the body and is uploaded to an omnipresent collective shared cyberspace. Humans are to forsake their bodies in favour of living as an essence only. It will be the ultimate «Brotherhood of Humankind», as visionaries Schiller and Beethoven once dreamt of.

All across the globe other Transhumans have already left their bodies. So Coraig has come with a dual purpose: to find the last rebellious Woman, and to shut down the island, the last vestiges of the Old Order.

Coraig gives the islanders the stark choice between dying on the doomed island or to join the transhumans in Singularity. The Wife, who has converted to be a transhuman, reappears. She bears witness of how wonderful her new life as a transhuman is, and the islanders are finally convinced to take the plunge and risk Singularity.

But as the process begins and their bodies drop to the ground doubts remain for the Husband and we are left to wonder: have they been successfully uploaded or have they actually, simply, been terminated.

 Only the Husband remains. Defiant and alone, he cries: «I am the last human. Greater than God!» But whom do we believe?

 

Nini Kjeldner har vært på sceneprøve på Elysium, kort tid før premieren
Introduksjonsforedrag ved Hedda Høgåsen-Hallesby
Møt komponist, regissør med flere i premieresamtale
Lydopptak fra fremtidsoperaen Elysium
Hva er et menneske? Hvor går grensen mellom våre kropper, våre tanker og ny teknologi?Nils Harald Sødal i Rolf Wallins nye opera Elysium

Teknologi og kjærlighet – en fremtidsfabel

Rolf Wallin i samtale med Bodil Maroni Jensen

– Når teppet går ned, skal man sitte igjen og lure på om det har gått bra eller ikke, om de transhumane er blitt opphøyet til singularitet, vi vet jo ikke…

Komponisten Rolf Wallin sitter henført og snakker om sluttscenen i operaen Elysium, en fabel der utopiske drømmer og skrekkscenarier veksler om å ha overtaket. Librettoen henter næring fra teorier og spekulasjoner om hvordan teknologien kan utvikle og endre mennesket til det bedre. Likevel er det ikke forestillinger om fremskritt som er hovedsaken, forteller han. Det er frykten for det ukjente. Tvilen som melder seg før man tar avgjørelser hvor det ikke er noen vei tilbake.

– Vi prøver å belyse redselen for forandringer, men også viljen til forandring, begge deler unikt menneskelig.

Rolf Wallin er opptatt av eksempler i historien som viser at det vi i dag tar som selvfølgelige rettigheter og opplagt levevis, i sin tid ble oppfattet som unaturlig eller i strid med Guds vilje. Spørsmålet han stilte seg da han gikk i gang med operaen var dette:

– Hvilket framskritt ville vi liberale, frihetselskende vestlige oppleve som "mot naturen" i dag?

Chip og empati

Operaen har navn etter den mytologiske forestillingen om Elysium, det evig paradisiske tilholdssted. Wallin trekker frem Beethovens 9. symfoni og Schillers Ode til gleden, der det handler om Gleden – Elysiums datter, og om rettferdighet og brorskap.

– Dette har vi sunget om i nærmere 200 år, men ennå har vi ikke klart å få det til! Kanskje er det empatien vi mangler? Kanskje vi ikke er empatiske nok?

Dermed kom ideen med chipen, implantert også i operaen.

– Chipen er et bilde på utvidet empati. Selv om den er teknisk, kan den gjøre oss mer menneskelige, hvis menneskelig betyr å ha medfølelse. Tenk om det ville være den eneste måten å komme videre på, å operere inn noe i kroppen?

Ved hjelp av chipen kan menneskene utveksle alt av tanker og følelser på et millisekund. Misforståelser, krig og konflikter forsvinner, forklarer han.

– Språket vårt er jo så forferdelig begrenset og klossete i forhold til det rike mylderet av tanker, emosjoner og sansninger vi opplever inne i oss selv, men som det er så vanskelig å formidle til andre. Og ofte blir misforståelsene til hat og vold.

Og hit vil han gjerne få oss, Rolf Wallin, så vi vil tenke: «Åh, det hadde vært så fint å være der, hvor alle forstår hverandre. »

– Er vi kapable til å være humane?

Rolf Wallin er engasjert i politikk og samfunnsutvikling, men han har ikke villet blande sine egne standpunkter inn i operaen. Det han har villet er å vekke reaksjoner og refleksjoner.

– Det en opera kan gjøre, er å hensette publikum til et sted de ikke kunne kommet til på en annen måte. Du flytter inn i en verden som forhåpentligvis gjør at du går ut med noen refleksjoner som også går dypere inn i hva det er å være et menneske.

Selv om Wallin ønsker å holde sine egne synspunkter utenfor i denne operaen, er det en tydelig pessimisme å spore når man snakker med ham.

– Vi er ikke kommet så mye videre, sier han, med tanke på alle håp og ønsker og politisk gode hensikter opp gjennom tidene. – Men vi bør vel se å få orden på sakene våre uten å operere chips inn i halsen…

En tradisjonell opera

På tross av den eksperimentelle handlingen, er Elysium en tradisjonell opera, sier Rolf Wallin, hvis «tradisjonell» refererer til en utvikling som fornyer seg, i motsetning til «konvensjonell», som sier at det har stivnet og står stille.

Librettoen er skrevet som et psykologisk utviklingsdrama. De fem solistene bruker både klassisk syngemåte og syngestil fra pop og rock. Til forskjell fra tradisjonell operasang synges det med mikrofon, og der kommunikasjonen går via en chip i halsen, blir stemmene elektronisk bearbeidet. Likevel er idealene de store operakomponistene:

– Dette er egentlig helt i Strauss-Debussy-Wagner-tradisjonen, alle de jeg ser opp til. Spørsmålet er bare hva jeg i dag gjør med mitt språk i denne tradisjonen?

Rolf Wallin er kjent som en briljant instrumentalkomponist. Han har skrevet et stort antall orkesterverk, flere av dem med improvisatorisk-pregede raffinerte solistforløp i stor flukt over orkesteret. Han har skrevet lite for den menneskelige stemmen, men har til gjengjeld stor erfaring med scenemusikk for ballett, der musikken heller ikke «står alene», men må ta hensyn til andre elementer.

– På en måte må du vike litt tilbake og tenke annerledes enn når du skriver for orkester alene, sier Rolf Wallin.



Musikalsk samtale

Mark Ravenhill i samtale med Bodil Maroni Jensen

Mark Ravenhill er en av Englands fremste dramatikere. Han slo igjennom med stykket Shopping and Fucking i 1996 og har siden skrevet noen og tjue teaterstykker. I tillegg har han skrevet TV-serier og egne one man-shows, og i 2012 og -13 var han husdikter i Royal Shakespeare Company. Når det gjelder tekst til musikk, har han skrevet librettoen til en kammeropera, tekstene til en sangsyklus og har også begynte å legge inn sangtekster i egne stykker. I 2011 gjendiktet han, med stor frihet, G. F. Busenellos libretto til Poppeas kroning av Monteverdi.

Elysium er hans første libretto til en helaftens opera. Så hva er en libretto, sammenlignet med et teaterstykke? Ravenhill svarer på bakgrunn av samarbeidet med Rolf Wallin, som har gått over fire år.

– Librettoen er i utgangspunktet en ganske personlig tekst skrevet til komponisten, en samtale og en inspirasjon for komponisten. Vanligvis skriver jeg for skuespillere, men her er det komponisten som skal levere materialet til rollene. På en måte føler jeg meg som en junior-partner. En libretto er noe komponisten kan skrive best mulige musikk til.

Hva er hovedtemaet i librettoen?

– På et plan er det en kjærlighetshistorie. Hva gjør du når du finner den personen du elsker? Tilpasser du deg det livet der det kan leves? Og et annet tema er: Hvor går vi med denne teknologien? Stopper vi å være menneskelige, eller kan vi bli mer menneskelige? Jeg har prøvd å lage historien slik at den er ganske åpen. Mye science fiction i dag er dystopisk. Jeg har prøvd å si at dette er muligheter, så får publikum diskutere om det er skremmende eller positivt for fremtiden.

Kjærlighet til operaen

Mark Ravenhill studerte engelsk og drama ved universitetet i Bristol og begynte tidlig som teaterregissør, men opera hadde han knapt sett før han kom til London i 1990. Han var 24 år gammel og fikk jobb som billett- og programselger på English National Opera. Fordi én måtte være brannvakt hver kveld, fikk han sitte i salen og se en lang rekke operaer i løpet av halvannet år. Alltid var det noen som la igjen programmet, og Mark tok det med seg og leste. Så begynte han å kjøpe plater og lærte seg å lese partiturer.

– Det var nærmest som en opera-kveldsskole, en fin utdannelse. Jeg oppdaget denne fantastiske verdenen, og jeg elsker det magiske som komponister og sangere kan skape.

Hva kan da være en fin introduksjon til Mark Ravenhills verden? Han foreslår siste samle-utgave av teaterstykker, Plays 3. Kanskje det kunne være noe å plukke opp, etter denne forestillingen?

Norges første kyborg?

Tekst og foto: Hedda Høgåsen-Hallesby

Det er mange som gjerne vil teste den nyeste teknologien, men Aleksander Hindenes tar skrittet lenger enn de fleste. I likhet med de transhumane i Elysium har han en chip operert inn under huden.

Det er ennå ferskt og såret etter den store sprøytespissen synes fortsatt. Det var på en konferanse i Malmø i november 2015 at den unge IT-konsulenten fikk tilbud om å bryte barrieren mellom kroppen og teknologien i form av en glasskapsel med en chip på størrelse med et riskorn.

Fortsatt spor etter sprøyta

- Det var en fyr som til vanlig driver med tatovering og implantater som gjorde det. Og så lenge jeg ble forsikret om at det ikke var noe problem om å ta den ut igjen, måtte jeg jo prøve det. Jeg har alltid vært opptatt av ny teknologi og hva den kan gjøre for oss, forteller Aleksander.

Men i motsetning til de transhumanes chipper i Elysium, gjør ikke Aleksanders ham til et bedre menneske. Faktisk vet han ennå ikke helt hva han skal med den, bare hvilket potensiale den har.

- Det den kan er å snakke i NFC-koder, altså Near Field Communication med ulike former for lesere, som for eksempel finnes i Android-telefoner. Den har en ID og kan sende kontaktinfo. Det likner på RFID, som kanskje flere kjenner til.

Så hva kan du bruke dette til, da?

- Potensielt til ulike typer adgangskort og nøkkelkort, som når du skal identifisere deg på et treningssenter, vise månedskort på trikken eller åpne døra hjemme og på jobb. Etter hvert vil vi kanskje også kunne bruke denne teknologien til å betale med. Men foreløpig finnes det ikke noen gode måter å integrere egne NFC-brikker med disse løsningene. Derfor må jeg gjøre en innsats for hver tjeneste jeg ønsker å bruke chipen mot. Slik er jeg kanskje forut for min tid, smiler Aleksander, som forteller han har tenkt å spørre kantina på jobb om han kan få bruke den der. Han har også vurdert å skifte dørlåsen hjemme, slik at den lille harde kulen rett over tommelleddet kan komme til nytte.

Hadde du ingen betenkeligheter med å integrere teknologien i kroppen din?

- Jeg var litt redd for om glasskapselen som chippen ligger inne i kunne bli ødelagt, men det skjer bare dersom hele hånda mi knuser, og da har jeg antakelig helt andre problemer.

Hvor ville grensen gått for deg?

- Jeg hadde nok ikke vært villig til å inkludere noe som påvirket tankene mine, eller min måte å erfare verden på. Dersom det hadde vært strøm i denne, hadde jeg nok også vært mer skeptisk, sier 25-åringen. Hans chip kan altså bare leses av, ikke sende ut informasjon på egenhånd.

Hvilke reaksjoner får du når du forteller om at du har datateknologi under huden?

- De fleste synes det er spennende. Og foreldrene mine hadde nok syntes det hadde vært verre om jeg kom hjem med en tatovering. Chippen kan jeg jo bare ta ut igjen.

Aleksander svarer gjerne på henvendelser, dersom du er nysgjerrig! Mailadressen hans er: aleksander.hindenes@gmail.com

Aleksander Hindenes

  • Flotte scener og ubehagelige spørsmål

    Monday, March 14, 2016
    Astrid Kvalbein anmelder Elysium
    Read more
  • Sent på jorden

    Monday, March 14, 2016
    Vårt land kaller Elysium en suksess
    Read more
  • Utopi med overskudd

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016
    Dagsvisen mener verket står igjen som levende, gjennomtenkt helhet
    Read more
  • A triumph

    Monday, March 14, 2016
    Financial Times kaller Elysium A triumph
    Read more
  • Kunstig intelligens er mer enn robotgressklippere

    Sunday, November 15, 2015
    Hanna Stoltenberg om Kunstig intelligens i D2
    Read more
  • Roboten som erstatter deg er en myte

    Saturday, February 13, 2016
    Bjørn Stærk om samhandling mellom robot og menneske
    Read more
  • Det er ikke usannsynlig at kunstig intelligens kan løse kreftgåten

    Wednesday, February 10, 2016
    Per Kristian Bjørkeng i Aftenposten om kunstig intelligens
    Read more
  • Elon Musk's vision for the future

    Sunday, November 15, 2015
    Elon Musk talks about his visions for the future
    Read more

Dates

Completed

  • Scene
    :
    Main House
  • Price
    :
    100 - 645 NOK
  • /
    1 intermission

March 2016

Completed
Completed
Completed
Completed
Completed
Completed

April 2016

Completed